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there is a history of smallpox inoculation that goes back as far as 1000 ad in china, africa, and turkey. however, the person credited with creating the first vaccine is edward jenner, an english scientist who pioneered one for smallpox in 1796. his breakthrough came from taking pus from a blister of someone infected with cowpox and using it to inoculate another person, thus preventing smallpox in that person. he developed this treatment after hypothesizing that dairy workers were rarely, if ever, infected with the deadly smallpox virus because most of them were already infected with cowpox, which has a very mild effect on humans.

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bradly buckridge

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2020-03-03 22:54:04
this answer is:
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morgan talbott

lvl 1
2021-04-30 19:28:15
my friends cousin
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aden ma

lvl 1
2021-05-06 00:33:28
ok
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kevin sanchez

lvl 1
2021-05-17 16:24:13
that’s a lie morgan.
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shafi musa

lvl 1
2021-05-17 16:49:11
edward jenner
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xiaoju zhao

lvl 1
2021-05-19 04:09:43
this guy is so smart! where did you research that?
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username

lvl 1
2021-05-21 23:34:12
[email protected] [email protected] small pox [email protected] [email protected] cowpox and its just like smallpox but weaker can if put cowpox in people the cells figure out how to fight cowpox and when the smallpox comes. they know how to fight it. also you literally have coronavirus in you if you too
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username

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2021-05-21 23:34:30
k the coronavirus vaccine
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imane drawing

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2021-05-25 17:13:48
loiuse pasteure
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nathasha madigasekar...

lvl 1
2021-06-13 05:40:28
these days there are lots of vaccines!
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mice pigs

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2021-06-17 12:27:27
billy mental case
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ok

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2021-07-06 11:01:08
vaccine is practice
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benalaoui

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2021-07-10 18:36:33
the discovery of photographic machines because they meet the daily needs see amzn.to/3p436eg
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elaha saadati

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2021-07-14 09:23:18
me
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adrian daniel

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2021-07-14 11:51:30
k
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md. nur azad

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2021-07-18 09:14:35
thanks you ans....

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flower girl

lvl 3
2021-05-06 00:01:19

edward jenner is considered the founder of vaccinology in the west in 1796, after he inoculated a 13 year-old-boy with vaccinia virus (cowpox), and demonstrated immunity to smallpox. in 1798, the first smallpox vaccine was developed.

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elmer yost

lvl 1
2021-05-06 15:05:47
absolutely!
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brailynn broadnax

lvl 1
2021-05-06 16:09:07
i did the
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brailynn broadnax

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2021-05-06 16:09:07
i did the
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oduro messi

lvl 1
2021-05-21 17:46:58
you are right.

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trussti das

lvl 6
2021-07-20 03:38:59

the english doctor thomas dimsdale was nervous.

it was the evening of october 12, 1768, and dimsdale was preparing the empress of russia , catherine the great, for her procedure. from a technical perspective, what he planned was simple, medically sound, and minimally invasive. it required only two or three small slices into catherine’s arm. nevertheless, dimsdale had good reason for his concern, because into those slices he would grind a few scabby pustules teeming with variola—the virus responsible for smallpox and the death of nearly a third of those who contracted it. though he infected catherine at her behest, dimsdale was so concerned about the outcome that he secretly arranged for a stagecoach to rush him out of saint petersburg should his procedure go awry.

what dimsdale planned is alternatively called a variolation or inoculation, and while it was dangerous it nevertheless represented the pinnacle of medical achievement at the time. in a variolation, a doctor transferred smallpox pustules from a sick patient into a healthy one because—for reasons no one at the time understood—a variolated patient typically developed only a mild case of smallpox while still gaining lifelong immunity.

twenty-eight years later, edward jenner improved this proto-vaccination when he discovered he could use a safer, sister virus of variola called cowpox to inoculate his patients. but it’s the original variolation—not jenner’s vaccine—that first established the efficacy of the crazy, and at the time ludicrously dangerous, idea upon which nearly all vaccines rely: the intentional infection of a healthy person with a weakened pathogen to bequeath immunity.

modern immunologists have advanced this life-saving concept to such a degree that if they find a vaccine for covid-19, it will pose no risk of widespread infection. inoculums today induce the production of antibodies while being incapable of large-scale reproduction. but that wasn’t the case when they were first discovered. when dimsdale variolated catherine, his process merely gave her immune system the upper hand. he knew she would sicken.

by now we are so familiar with the lifesaving concept behind vaccines that it’s easy to forget how insane, genius, and unethical these first inoculations must have been. even dimsdale, who had performed the procedure thousands of times, was clearly skeptical that he could talk his way out of a noose should catherine’s variolation end poorly.

and yet the idea to intentionally infect a patient with a lethal virus to help them did first occur to someone—and it was perhaps the greatest idea in the history of medicine.

it was not jenner’s idea, nor was it dimsdale’s. but it may have been a single person’s. remarkably, variolation may not have been independently discovered. instead, the earliest documentation suggests it began in china—probably in the southwestern provinces of either anhui or jiangxi—before spreading across the globe in a cascading series of introductions.

chinese merchants introduced variolation to india and brought knowledge of the practice to africa, where it became widespread. in 1721 an enslaved african man named onesimus–who may have been born in west africa though exactly where is unknown–was variolated as a child before slave traders brought him to boston . once in new england , onesimus taught his enslaver cotton mather the practice, and mather successfully convinced doctors in the americas of its efficacy.

finally, chinese traders traveling along the silk road brought inoculation to turkey, where 18th-century european ambassadors learned the technique and took it home. this cascading series of introductions combined with the timing and path of variolation’s spread suggests that the idea originated in one place, at one time. perhaps from one person.

according to one legend, recounted in yü thien-chhih’s collected commentaries on smallpox, written in 1727, the first inoculator was “an eccentric and extraordinary man who had himself derived it from the alchemical adepts.”

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kara white

lvl 1
2021-07-22 04:05:41
thxx

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ernestnj

lvl 2
2021-07-05 16:31:18

every answer given here is incorrect and only goes to show, in part, how the history of black people gets usurped, slurped up, and regurgitated as white history until someone white chooses not to be a coward and a credit seeker but instead chooses to destroy the lies with the truth.

the practice of vaccination started with a black slave named onesimus who brought the practice from africa to america as a slave. to read a true partial history behind this amazing story just google: "how a slave named onesimus saved boston from smallpox. " the one thing you will note is how the actions of onesimus preceded by years any other so-called discovery by some idiot in england or elsewhere. in short, here is a summary from wiki: onesimus was an african man who was instrumental in the mitigation of the impact of a smallpox outbreak in boston, massachusetts . his birth name is unknown. he was enslaved and, in 1706, was given to the new england puritan minister cotton mather, who renamed him. onesimus introduced mather to the principle and procedure of inoculation to prevent the disease, which laid the foundation for the development of vaccines. after a smallpox outbreak began in boston in 1721, mather used this knowledge to advocate for inoculation in the population, a practice that eventually spread to other colonies. in a 2016 boston magazine survey, onesimus was declared one of the "best bostonians of all time".

as you can see, just like in many other so-called other discoveries attributed by others to the white race, the truth is white folk would have been extinct were it not for the past historical kindnesses of black people, native americans( scurvy), and mexicans( penicillin), chinese( tons of stuff), etc. but let y'all tell it, everything was a white thing...including the biggest lie of all: that jesus was white.

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bennie schultz

lvl 1
2021-07-06 18:05:34
can you explain how you know that?

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lily bai

lvl 5
2021-06-05 04:09:13

edward jenner is considered the founder of vaccinology in the west in 1796, after he inoculated a 13 year-old-boy with vaccinia virus (cowpox), and demonstrated immunity to smallpox. in 1798, the first smallpox vaccine was developed.

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tuongtrau

lvl 6
2021-06-17 09:41:28

there is a history of smallpox inoculation that goes back as far as 1000 ad in china, africa, and turkey. however, the person credited with creating the first vaccine is edward jenner, an english scientist who pioneered one for smallpox in 1796. his breakthrough came from taking pus from a blister of someone infected with cowpox and using it to inoculate another person, thus preventing smallpox in that person. he developed this treatment after hypothesizing that dairy workers were rarely, if ever, infected with the deadly smallpox virus because most of them were already infected with cowpox, which has a very mild effect on humans.

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mohammad nabeel ahsa...

lvl 6
2021-06-15 07:06:24

there is a history of smallpox inoculation that goes back as far as 1000 ad in china, africa, and turkey. however, the person credited with creating the first vaccine is edward jenner, an english scientist who pioneered one for smallpox in 1796. his breakthrough came from taking pus from a blister of someone infected with cowpox and using it to inoculate another person, thus preventing smallpox in that person. he developed this treatment after hypothesizing that dairy workers were rarely, if ever, infected with the deadly smallpox virus because most of them were already infected with cowpox, which has a very mild effect on humans.

the first vaccine

as the world scrambles to develop an inoculation against covid-19, it’s worth understanding the early, extraordinary history of the technique.

painting of dr. jenner giving a young boy an inoculation while a woman holds the child

edward jenner using cowpox to inoculate a child against smallpox. he was improving on a technique used by thomas dimsdale almost 30 years previously to inoculate catherine the great.wellcome images/science source

the english doctor thomas dimsdale was nervous.

it was the evening of october 12, 1768, and dimsdale was preparing the empress of russia, catherine the great, for her procedure. from a technical perspective, what he planned was simple, medically sound, and minimally invasive. it required only two or three small slices into catherine’s arm. nevertheless, dimsdale had good reason for his concern, because into those slices he would grind a few scabby pustules teeming with variola—the virus responsible for smallpox and the death of nearly a third of those who contracted it. though he infected catherine at her behest, dimsdale was so concerned about the outcome that he secretly arranged for a stagecoach to rush him out of saint petersburg should his procedure go awry.

what dimsdale planned is alternatively called a variolation or inoculation, and while it was dangerous it nevertheless represented the pinnacle of medical achievement at the time. in a variolation, a doctor transferred smallpox pustules from a sick patient into a healthy one because—for reasons no one at the time understood—a variolated patient typically developed only a mild case of smallpox while still gaining lifelong immunity.

twenty-eight years later, edward jenner improved this proto-vaccination when he discovered he could use a safer, sister virus of variola called cowpox to inoculate his patients. but it’s the original variolation—not jenner’s vaccine—that first established the efficacy of the crazy, and at the time ludicrously dangerous, idea upon which nearly all vaccines rely: the intentional infection of a healthy person with a weakened pathogen to bequeath immunity.

modern immunologists have advanced this life-saving concept to such a degree that if they find a vaccine for covid-19, it will pose no risk of widespread infection. inoculums today induce the production of antibodies while being incapable of large-scale reproduction. but that wasn’t the case when they were first discovered. when dimsdale variolated catherine, his process merely gave her immune system the upper hand. he knew she would sicken.

by now we are so familiar with the lifesaving concept behind vaccines that it’s easy to forget how insane, genius, and unethical these first inoculations must have been. even dimsdale, who had performed the procedure thousands of times, was clearly skeptical that he could talk his way out of a noose should catherine’s variolation end poorly.

and yet the idea to intentionally infect a patient with a lethal virus to help them did first occur to someone—and it was perhaps the greatest idea in the history of medicine.

it was not jenner’s idea, nor was it dimsdale’s. but it may have been a single person’s. remarkably, variolation may not have been independently discovered. instead, the earliest documentation suggests it began in china—probably in the southwestern provinces of either anhui or jiangxi—before spreading across the globe in a cascading series of introductions.

chinese merchants introduced variolation to india and brought knowledge of the practice to africa, where it became widespread. in 1721 an enslaved african man named onesimus–who may have been born in west africa though exactly where is unknown–was variolated as a child before slave traders brought him to boston. once in new england, onesimus taught his enslaver cotton mather the practice, and mather successfully convinced doctors in the americas of its efficacy.

finally, chinese traders traveling along the silk road brought inoculation to turkey, where 18th-century european ambassadors learned the technique and took it home. this cascading series of introductions combined with the timing and path of variolation’s spread suggests that the idea originated in one place, at one time. perhaps from one person.

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mattyh78

lvl 5
2021-06-14 13:36:13

from a technical perspective, what he planned was simple, medically sound, and minimally invasive. it required only two or three small slices into catherine’s arm. nevertheless, dimsdale had good reason for his concern, because into those slices he would grind a few scabby pustules teeming with variola—the virus responsible for smallpox and the death of nearly a third of those who contracted it. though he infected catherine at her behest, dinsdale was so concerned about the outcome that he secretly arranged for a stagecoach to rush him out of saint petersburg should his procedure go away.

what dinsdale planned is alternatively called a variolation or inoculation and while it was dangerous it nevertheless represented the pinnacle of medical achievement at the time. in a variolation, a doctor transferred smallpox pustules from a sick patient into a healthy one because—for reasons no one at the time understood—a variolated patient typically developed only a mild case of smallpox while still gaining lifelong immunity. twenty-eight years later, edward jenner improved this proto-vaccination when he discovered he could use a safer, sister virus of variola called cowpox to inoculate his patients. but it’s the original variolation—not jenner’s vaccine—that first established the efficacy of the crazy, and at the time ludicrously dangerous, idea upon which nearly all vaccines rely: the intentional infection of a healthy person with a weakened pathogen to bequeath immunity.

modern immunologists have advanced this life-saving concept to such a degree that if they find a vaccine for covid-19, it will pose no risk of widespread infection. inoculums today induce the production of antibodies while being incapable of large-scale reproduction. but that wasn’t the case when they were first discovered. when dimsdale variolated catherine, his process merely gave her immune system the upper hand. he knew she would sicken.

by now we are so familiar with the lifesaving concept behind vaccines that it’s easy to forget how insane, genius, and unethical these first inoculations must have been. even dimsdale, who had performed the procedure thousands of times, was clearly skeptical that he could talk his way out of a noose should catherine’s variolation end poorly.

and yet the idea to intentionally infect a patient with a lethal virus to help them did first occur to someone—and it was perhaps the greatest idea in the history of medicine.

it was not jenner’s idea, nor was it dimsdale’s. but it may have been a single person’s. remarkably, variolation may not have been independently discovered. instead, the earliest documentation suggests it began in china—probably in the southwestern provinces of either anhui or jiangxi—before spreading across the globe in a cascading series of introductions.

chinese merchants introduced variolation to india and brought knowledge of the practice to africa, where it became widespread. in 1721 an enslaved african man named onesimus–who may have been born in west africa though exactly where is unknown–was variolated as a child before slave traders brought him to boston. once in new england, onesimus taught his enslaver cotton mather the practice, and mather successfully convinced doctors in the americas of its efficacy.

finally, chinese traders traveling along the silk road brought inoculation to turkey, where 18th-century european ambassadors learned the technique and took it home. this cascading series of introductions combined with the timing and path of variolation’s spread suggests that the idea originated in one place, at one time. perhaps from one person.

according to one legend, recounted in yü thien-chhih’s collected commentaries on smallpox, written in 1727, the first inoculator was “an eccentric and extraordinary man who had himself derived it from the alchemical adepts.” who was this “eccentric and extraordinary man” who invented immunology with one of the greatest ideas and boldest experiments in medical history?

his or her name is not only long lost, but it was probably never written. however, legends and ancient chinese medical treatises make it possible to construct a plausible biography for someone who i’ll simply call the “extraordinary man,” after thien-chhih’s legend, or “x” for short.

x may have been a healer, a traveler, and someone who believed in practices outside the contemporary chinese medical mainstream, according to the biochemist and historian joseph needham. by the time "he" (if we take thien-chhih’s legend literally) practiced, mainstream chinese medicine was soundly based on pharmacies, physical therapy, and rational techniques. but x existed on the edge of it, mixing mainstream medical methods with magic.

he may have been what was referred to at the time as a fangshi, writes chia-feng chang in aspects of smallpox and its significance in chinese history. but fangshi is a word that in some ways defies translation.

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nishit doshi

lvl 3
2021-06-10 20:00:14

i also was asking this question like 2 months ago but recently i been using this free website to earn some extra cash every single months yeah every month which at first i wasn't sure but i kept using it for awhile and actually got paid you can use my referral link here: htt p s://exe.io/wa qyg4jz

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legend of lovely dea...

lvl 7
2021-05-13 19:44:00

short and simple answer:

edward jenner was the person who created it during ww1 because of a disease called a small box. george washington wanted him to help his troops of men to survive the winter at valley forge . edward jenner was a british doctor who created the vaccine for the american soldiers. edward saved lives during the war, his's technique was unique and very helpful.

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